Podcast Archive

A listener asks "the famous Carl Trueman" what “to be Reformed” really means, as Aimee and Todd play the mediators.

The term “Reformed” is full of meaning, but many times it’s reduced to simply mean holding to the five points of Calvinism or merely ascribing to a predestinarian theology. What does it mean to be Reformed, and—conversely—what does it not mean? What bearing does the 16th and 17th-century church have on this word today, and what other factors make one’s faith practice truly Reformed? Does Reformed theology necessitate Reformed liturgy? How do you know you just walked into a Reformed church? The famous Dr. Trueman answers it all.

 

We enjoy a pleasant visit with Terry Johnson. He’s the senior minister of Independent Presbyterian Church in Savannah, GA, where he’s been serving since 1987. Eons ago, Terry had planned on teaching a 10-part series on the attributes of God…which turned into 82, as he immersed himself in the greatest classical literature on the doctrine of God. Such preparation and teaching has not only blessed his congregation, it has deeply inspired, challenged, and enriched Terry’s personal life, resulting in his latest book: The Identity and Attributes of God, published by Banner of Truth.

Join us and discover how the immutability and impassibility of God have implications for, and practical impact on, everything that we believe. 

Worship: The Chief End of Man is the main theme of the Quakertown Conference on Reformed Theology, sponsored by the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals, happening this November 8 and 9. 

The crew sits down with Quakertown conference speaker Jonathan Master to get a glimpse of the wonderful lineup of teachers and the topics they’ll address. Jonathan is dean of the School of Divinity and professor of theology at Cairn University and the co-host of the Alliance’s Theology on the Go podcast. He’s excited to share with us the focus of the conference, and engages our hosts in a general discussion of worship as well.

Rutledge Etheridge is in the house. He’s assistant professor of Biblical Studies at Geneva College, a former chaplain in the same institution, and an ordained minister at Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America. “Rut” is the author of God Breathed: Connecting Through Scripture to God, Others, The Natural World, and Yourself, which was born from a rhetorical question by Augustine, fascinating personal observations, and the desire to dig deeper into the disconnect between the claims of Jesus and the way society at large lives day to day.

Etheridge explains what he means by “The Ceiling of Self,” and why it’s such a wonderless and lonely place to be. Don’t miss this fascinating conversation on theology, philosophy, and apologetics. 

A few sad recent events have caught the attention of the media, and our trio is talking through the high profile, so-called Christian “influencers” who have publicly declared their departure from the faith. Is it possible to pinpoint a pathological cultural pattern as a motive for such departures? Is it fair to draw a connection between local church commitment (or the lack thereof) and apostasy? Some of the defectors accuse the Church of never addressing a host of life issues. Is that accusation legitimate? If so, to what extent?

Because three heads think better than one…Carl, Todd, and Aimee join forces to weigh in on the product of celebrity and youth culture, and the indispensable role of the local church. 

Unable to catch any decent waves this morning, Danny Hyde pumped up the volume of his hair and came over for a chat about his latest work, written in celebration of the 400th anniversary of the Canons of Dort. Danny is the pastor of Oceanside United Reformed Church in Carlsbad, California, and author of several books. 

Grace Worth Fighting For is a thorough examination of the history and text of the articles discussed and debated at the Synod of Dort, and what it really means to be Reformed. 

What do the Canons offer that the Westminster Standards don’t? What are the distinctives of the Canons, and what is its relevance for our day?

Listen to Pastor Danny give these answers in a passionate and pastoral way.

The gang gathers in the bunker to answer some listener questions. From the holy to the profane, funny to offensive, all kinds of queries drive today’s episode. 

Will Baptists go to heaven? Who in the world is Nate Diaz? Differences between the PCA and the OPC, the influence of Van Tilian apologetics outside the US, Luther, Jimmy Hendrix, Calvin, and Sinatra--there’s a lot to cover. Listen as Todd shoots himself in the foot by declining a dinner invitation from the rest of the crew—you’ll enjoy every moment!

 

Versace, Maserati, private jets. What do the lives of “Christian celebrities” look like? Costi Hinn pays a visit to the bunker to chat about the ostentatious lifestyle he experienced growing up around his uncle Benny Hinn.

Costi has recently authored God, Greed, and the (Prosperity) Gospel: How Truth Overwhelms a Life Built on Lies where he not only exposes the fallacies of the prosperity gospel and its dangers, but the means God used to open his eyes to the truths of Scripture and the value of a godly wife throughout the process.

Do prosperity gospel teachers genuinely believe the message they preach? The answer may surprise you!

Some issues in the church are unlikely to go away anytime soon. Unfortunately, reports of spiritual, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse keep surfacing in Christian circles everywhere, so the Spin team examines the scars of emotional abuse in particular and the parameters of the authority that church leadership has over their congregants.

What does consist as an abusive behavior? What is the authority given to leaders in the church, and is there a tool or system to curb and restrain abuse of power? How does one to proceed when spiritual or emotional abuse is detected, but there’s no obvious criminality involved? 

Among his many qualifications, Neil Shenvi is a critical theory analyst. His broad understanding of the subject allows us to learn about critical theory’s greatest past and present supporters, as well as the danger it can pose for Christianity. Neil warns against uncritically adopting liberation theology and the extreme heterodoxy of some of its proponents. 

What is the end goal of critical theory? Why have so many Christians been falling for its tenets, and where does the slippery slope start? Is there a connection between critical theory and identity politics? Carl pulls on his pink (OK, salmon-colored) pants to join Todd and Aimee for this engaging episode.